Reblogged from cthulhu-baby  10,484 notes

satanindisguise:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

 Stones and Bones by DZO olivierArtiphist

Artist on Tumblr

Born in a family environment conducive to graphic arts, the Graduate School of Fine Arts in Toulouse coming validate my vocation after 5 years of study. Attracted by all forms of artistic expression, it is first as a graphic designer I learns the techniques of image creation with a predilection for drawing and generally for anything that does not depend digital Design. The discovery of interactive pen displays however, offers me new horizons and now I do not impose any constraint in terms of pictures conception. Mixing styles and techniques is my way. This portfolio shows my personal artwor

foda

Reblogged from humansofnewyork  3,306 notes
humansofnewyork:

"It was March 5th, 1988. There was a prayer festival that day, so we thought it would be a good day to protest. It was entirely peaceful. We were only shouting three things: ‘Long live Dalai Lama,’ ‘Free Tibet,’ and ‘Bring Dalai Lama Back to Tibet.’ First they fired tear gas, and then they started shooting. A girl standing next to me got shot in the heart. We ran into the temple, but they came in and kept shooting. I saw three young boys get thrown off the roof. I was shot, but I managed to escape, and two Tibetan doctors helped remove the bullet. One of the doctors worked for the Chinese army, but she still helped me as a Tibetan. Soon there were posters of me hanging up all over town. They said I was a dangerous monk. My friends dressed me in women’s clothes. For a week, I wore lipstick and rings and long hair. But at one point I tried to visit my mother, and that is when they found me."
(Dharamshala, India)

humansofnewyork:

"It was March 5th, 1988. There was a prayer festival that day, so we thought it would be a good day to protest. It was entirely peaceful. We were only shouting three things: ‘Long live Dalai Lama,’ ‘Free Tibet,’ and ‘Bring Dalai Lama Back to Tibet.’ First they fired tear gas, and then they started shooting. A girl standing next to me got shot in the heart. We ran into the temple, but they came in and kept shooting. I saw three young boys get thrown off the roof. I was shot, but I managed to escape, and two Tibetan doctors helped remove the bullet. One of the doctors worked for the Chinese army, but she still helped me as a Tibetan. Soon there were posters of me hanging up all over town. They said I was a dangerous monk. My friends dressed me in women’s clothes. For a week, I wore lipstick and rings and long hair. But at one point I tried to visit my mother, and that is when they found me."

(Dharamshala, India)